Preparing for Disasters

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jckitty
Posts: 1333
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 8:55 pm

Re: Preparing for Disasters

Post by jckitty » Sun Jun 05, 2016 11:03 am

I have been giving this thread a lot of thought, because I believe we should all have a plan.
I have always had prep in place but am always looking for ways to make improvements. I prep for the whole family just in case as we spend so much time together.
Right now food and gas and such are handled.... it's water storage that is a problem for me. Storing bottled water is just hard for me, I think in terms of rotating and having to recycle the containers. I have an issue with buying bottled water. personal opinion... I think large rain barrels and a purification system are my best bet???? I have a small pond and a creek but taken to weather extremes the creek can and has dried up to next to nothing and it is fed into by field drainage and with all of the chemicals used by farmers. The only way to use that water is for stool flushing and I would rather use an outdoor Privy. Which by the way I can assemble in minutes....5 gallon bucket, garbage bags and an old toilet seat saved for that purpose.
Good, interesting thread.
JCKitty

blondeinbuffalo
Posts: 939
Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:37 am

Re: Preparing for Disasters

Post by blondeinbuffalo » Mon Jun 06, 2016 5:01 am

usually all we have to worry about is a lot of snow, sometimes blizzards. you have to stay home of find shelter quickly. I do carry a bag with a change of clothes, some food and water. I have been caught in my car overnight as the road were so bad people abandoned their cars and I could not pass them. no fun.

have stockpile to save money and to be prepared for the winter months. lots of candles, lighters and matches. stockpile of water, 4 cases just in case. in the winter we both try to top off the gas tanks frequently. have laterns and a small charcoal grill, and a few bags of charcoal too. we have had power outages in the area that last over 7 days. really need that built in generator, for peace of mind! cj

Dgflorida
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Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:10 pm

Re: Preparing for Disasters

Post by Dgflorida » Mon Jun 06, 2016 6:56 pm

I agree about the generator, but it is pretty far down the list of stuff. I wanted to get my windows improved, but the Florida codes made it cost prohibitive. I considered getting one window done, but I really didn't like my choices. I was working with the big box stores and it just didn't work out. I don't think the lawmakers realize that they create huge barriers to safety. If I could have installed the window of my choice, I would have been safer. So I will rethink my options. But before I could really focus on that, the cat and its mites and the rug as a culprit went to the top of the list. Then a new couple of doors.

dlrcpa
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Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:45 am

Re: Preparing for Disasters

Post by dlrcpa » Mon Jun 06, 2016 9:44 pm

A few years ago we had a very bad storm on the first day of the month - July I think. I had let the gas in my car get very low, and was also low on dog food. Power was out everywhere and it was possible I would not be able to get gasoline. I was kicking myself over those two things.

We have city water and only once have been under a warning to boil the water (the pumping station lost pressure during a hurricane I think.) So we still had water but had to boil any that would be consumed or used for cooking or dish washing.

Someone had the suggestion a few years back to get all your laundry done if a storm is expected. Having clean clothes to last for a week or more is nice. I am guilty of letting the laundry pile up also.

Vaeagen
Posts: 168
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 8:03 pm

Re: Preparing for Disasters

Post by Vaeagen » Tue Jun 07, 2016 8:59 am

Good topic and one that unfortunately, I have some experience with. here on Long Island we were hit big time by Super Storm Sandy. It was a disaster of epic proportions and we are still recovering from it 4 years later. Hurricanes and major snow storms are pretty often occurances. Here are some things I learned from Super Storm Sandy:

1) Know what is most likely to occur at your location. By that I mean, we purchased our house specifically because it is above the Cat 5 storm surge line. So if we get flooded basically the world has come to an end. But our 3 cousins live right next to the south shore ocean. Of course, when Sandy came they had 4 feet of the tidal surge water sweep through their houses. They know that they have a standing order to come to our house BEFORE any storm hits. They probably would have been killed or injured if they stayed during Sandy.

2) Be prepared for the worst and things to not be normal. This one we all botched. I was working for part of the disaster relief. We did not anticipate not being able to get food to feed ourselves and our crews. Sure we had electricity at our shops but with literally no food or supermarkets, delis, etc open....no food. Also my cousins only bought with them a change of clothes. Ahhhh, problem as all their clothes were in the houses that just had 4 feet of water in them that was contaminated by sewage (the sewer plant was basically destroyed by Sandy. I was fearful that there might be an outbreak of Colera (sp) but being late Oct helped that not to happen). So they had to quickly buy new clothes. Be prepared for a long haul.

3) have extra beds and linens. We had a total of 7 people living in my house for 6 months. You need extra beds(inflatable kind), pillows, sheets, towels, etc. Now if you go back to tip one you can try to plan how many people you might be hosting.

4) be Flexible. Things, as I said are not normal.....accept it and embrace it. We had fun being together and helping each other. My cousins cooked, cleaned and shopped for all of us. It was kinda like a commune but we all just laughted and any craziness.

5) Of course, it goes without saying to have canned food and a way to cook it. We have gas in our house (which will flow even without electricity) We also have a propane grill. Also oil lamps and electric flashlights and lanterns. Our power was out for about a week but I know people who's power was out for 3 weeks and they were no where near the flooding. Trees took down the power lines.

6) always have your car filled with car and don't drive it unless absolutely nessary as getting more gas might be extreamely difficult. Again with electricity down gas stations don't work. The police had to be called out to keep the peace at the few gas stations that could pump gas. You can imagine the scene at gas station as they ran out of gas. You don't want to be one of those desperate people trying to find gas.

I'm sure there are more things I can think of but from my Sandy experience I would say that making sure you can stay in a safe place for at least the first few days after a disaster would be the smartest, safest thing. The authorities need time to respond and get things under control and you need to not be out there in the midst of all the chaos.

Just my .02

Valerie

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delighted99
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Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2015 10:26 am

Re: Preparing for Disasters

Post by delighted99 » Tue Jun 07, 2016 9:41 pm

Jackielou wrote:While my little corner of Canada does not suffer from earthquakes, or tornadoes (once in a blue moon) or hurricanes we do have some natural disasters otherwise known as blizzards.

I prepare for this type of storm by stocking up on canned goods, keeping my freezers and fridge well stocked, having a good supply of blankets on hand, candles, battery operated lights and radio, and an alternate method of cooking.

How do you prepare for those disasters that may affect you?
Jackie, thanks for posting this. It made me take a quick inventory and realize I don't have any bottled water lying around. We need to keep a couple jugs of that for emergencies.

Last birthday I asked my mother-in-law for a rather practical gift. A weather radio. It can be powered several ways- through an outlet, solar, hand crank, and I would assume battery. We've had storms where I've tuned in to the weather bands and received helpful info.

This is a link to one similar:
http://www.esafetysupplies.com/Eton-Han ... aQodXAkLeQ

It apparently will charge a cell phone which is nice.

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